Discover Debina and Athiri Wine

While Debina and Athiri grapes are both Grecian varieties used to make white wine, they come from extremely different climates. Exploring these two varieties can give wine samplers an impression of the diversity of Greek white wine, and a taste of the difference between the continental and island flavors.

Debina grapes originate from Zitsa, one of the coldest wine regions in Greece. While summer in Zitsa is warm and breezy, winter often drops fluffy blankets of snow across the vineyards. These temperature variations particularly suit Debina grapes, allowing them to retain their acidity and create outstanding sparkling and dry white wine. The crisp, clear essence of Debina is akin to the flavors of a fresh orchard, leaving lingering fruity sensations across the palate.

Athiri is a white wine grape that is native to the Aegean Islands. For centuries, Athiri grapes have been cultivated on the rugged islands to produce dry white wine, much to the enjoyment of Greece and the rest of the world. Athiri’s bright, zesty character pairs well with Greek flavors such as olives, capers and tomatoes. Athiri’s modest, unobtrusive flavors make it an excellent choice to become acquainted with the dry white wine of the Aegean Islands.

Learn more about these and more up and coming grape varieties from Greece.

Pairing Delicious Greek Dessert Wines with Delectable Desserts

Enjoying a delicious dessert is a great way to spend the evening. Many desserts can also be paired deliciously with wine – especially Greek wines, which are known for their sweet choices.

The most noble of sweet wines is Samos. Pairing this honey-like wine with holiday pies is one of our best recommendations. If your dessert contains fruit, drinking a glass of Samos will enhance your dining experience.

You are a wine lover, so why not try a glass of Vinsanto? Santo stands for Santorini, which will recall strong images and amplify the emotion in your banqueting table. The intense flavors of nuts, dried fruit and caramel give this wine a truly unique blend. A salty cheese, i.e. a Roquefort, or a chocolate dessert pair splendidly with this wine choice. If you have never had either, try them for yourself.

Mavrodaphne of Patras is a sweet red wine with a thicker, flavorful, luscious taste. If you have a sweet tooth and love chocolate treats, choose a glass (or a bottle) of Mavrodaphne of Patras to pair with it.

No matter what delectable desserts you like to enjoy – we like many! – there is a Greek dessert wine to pair with it.

Can you say Agiorgitiko?

If you can’t, you should start practicing because this most prolific grape in Greece makes exceptionally food-friendly wines that match with a wide range of cuisines – perfect for holiday and hearty, winter meals!  Here’s a pronunciation hint:  wherever you see a “g”, say the sound of a “y”. Now try again:  A-yor-yi-ti-ko. Easy right? Well, if you’re still finding it difficult, you can call these wines Nemea, which is one of the largest and most famous wine regions of the Peloponnese peninsula.  The easiest part, if you’d like, is that you can call it St. George, which is the translation of Agiorgitiko into English. Most good sommeliers or wine store clerks will know the different terms. Continue reading Can you say Agiorgitiko?

Wine Worth Going to War for

In 418 BC, Athens and Sparta fought the largest land battle of the Peloponnesian War in what is known as the First Battle of Mantinea.  After your first taste of Mantinia’s wine made from the Moschofilero grape, you’ll know why the region is so prized today.  To really know if this was the cause of war, you’d have to ask a Spartan, as they were the ones who won. Continue reading Wine Worth Going to War for

World’s Most Unusual Vineyards

You may be used to seeing vineyards in neat, straight rows.  But that’s not the way they do it in Santorini, one of Greece’s most fascinating islands and the producer of some of the best wines using the Assyrtiko grape.  The vineyards are exposed to the sea and the wind blows too hard on the island to plant vineyards the usual way.  So they grow in clumps or baskets that are low to the ground and retain the moisture that collects during the night.  It practically never rains there. Continue reading World’s Most Unusual Vineyards